Sentences-The Long and Short-Revisited

Writing your first novel-Things you should know

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAiMAAAAJDg5M2Q4NGJiLTBhMTQtNDA5Ni1hNGVmLTM2YWRiZjczMDhjNQHave you ever read a sentence and thought it was way too long? The author lost you two commas ago, and now you have to go back and read the whole thing again, to try and figure out what’s going on.

Or maybe you read a short sentence, followed by another short sentence, and another, and you’re thinking whoa, slow down.

There’s not a set rule for sentence length. It should be determined based on what you’re trying to accomplish. There are good reasons for those long, you lost me sentences, and short, what just happened sentences.

What do short sentences do?

  • Create tension-When an author starts using short sentences, it’s usually a sign that something is about to happen.—-The dog growled. His teeth flashed. Jake turned. It was too late.
  • Call the attention of a reader to a significant detail—She walked past central park in Manhattan, with…

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3 thoughts on “Sentences-The Long and Short-Revisited

  1. I jumped over and had a look – good post! One of the more brilliant run-on sentences I’ve read was A. A. Milne’s in ‘Winnie The Pooh’, where he deliberately wrote an extended one as a metaphor for what the characters (Pooh and Piglet, I think) were doing, and told the readers he was doing it. Quintessentially gentle English humour of the very best kind.

    Liked by 1 person

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