Is your monster really scary enough for nightmares?

Jean's Writing

Monsters lurk about in many forms.

Doesn’t have to be Big Foot or a dragon. A hateful neighbor or classmate, a work colleague, even a stranger on the street can be monsters in your story.

One man’s monster is another man’s pet.  A monster can live in the protagonists past, their imagination or in a secret held close. It can take the form of an illogical or logical phobia, or a real flesh and blood monster.  

The trick to writing about monsters as well as fantasy creatures is in the description and then escalating that fear. Bringing that fear to life is the goal of writers.

Readers love to feel the fear of a character. The right description determines whether a character is a paper doll cutout or a 3D believable personality.

Now Y’all know how much I love my cheat sheets, so guess what? Seems there is a list for just about everything. After…

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2 thoughts on “Is your monster really scary enough for nightmares?

  1. Haha! Love this. “One man’s monster is another man’s pet.” That’s a great line. It never occurred to me that my “Atonement, Tennessee” book even might be scary. Suspenseful yes, but scary? So that’s what I told a coworker. She came back complaining that it gave her nightmares. Go figure… 😉

    Liked by 1 person

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