Rejection and Failure: Why There’s a Difference, and Why Neither Means You Should Quit…

by Ruth Harris on Anne R. Allen’s website:

Rejection can make us want to cry and/or break things but rejection is almost never personal and often has nothing to do with your book, either.

The sting of rejection can be bullied into submission with a can-do, eff-you spirit or maybe chocolate or a few glasses of wine—sometimes consumed together.

Rejection is temporary, a passing storm that helps writers develop the necessary thick skin and confident attitude, but it’s a sense of failure—often intertwined with fear—that can make us want to give up and quit.

Continue reading at the link below:

Frazzled, Frustrated, and Fed up. (Notice all the f-words in this post?)

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7 thoughts on “Rejection and Failure: Why There’s a Difference, and Why Neither Means You Should Quit…

  1. Oh, I never feel rejected because there is always something to learn. Life is an adventure and even what may appear, at first, to be not want you may have been looking for, there seems to always be a learning experience, a kind of silver lining and at the very least, it makes you stronger, better, because you know you can do almost anything! Karen 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great post – I read it over on-site and commented there. It’s true that a string of rejection letters (or cards, or simply not getting a response) is pretty down-heartening for an author. But it’s part of the business… and writing, if people are serious about being published, IS a business, not an emotionally-engaging pastime. That’s not to say it isn’t emotionally engaging when it’s looked on in a business sense, just that the mind-set has to view it as something more than a hobby.

    Liked by 2 people

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